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Say Yes to the (Ford) Dress!


Designers Create Haute Couture from Lights, Buttons, Gears and Levers of 2012 Ford Focus
Judy Clark, a nominee for Scottish designer of the year who worked under the late Alexander McQueen, was commissioned to create a dress in one week as part of the 100th anniversary of Ford in Britain. English jewelry designer Katherine Hawkins was issued a similar challenge – only use the parts to create a necklace.








At Ford, designers consider each new vehicle a work of art. Now the world of fashion can get a taste of that enthusiasm. Two young British designers have created haute couture – an elegant Edwardian dress and a showstopping necklace – comprised of parts from a 2012 Ford Focus.

Judy Clark, a nominee for Scottish designer of the year who worked under the late Alexander McQueen, was commissioned to create the dress in one week as part of the 100th anniversary of Ford in Britain. English jewelry designer Katherine Hawkins was issued a similar challenge – only use the parts to create a necklace.

Also using spray paint, tweed, leather, lace and silk chiffon the color of diesel, Clark formed her frock with the help of two boxes full of components sent by Ford. The parts, she said, included car keys, radio and dashboard components, seat covers and two red taillights.

Clark, who details her work on her blog, http://judyrclark.blogspot.com, calls the back of the dress the “engine,” where the smaller components have been stitched into a crinoline-style bustle. There, the eye is drawn upward, to the red taillights swaying at hip level and a biker-style jacket - complete with speedometer – created from seat covers.

Inspired by the Edwardian time period, Clark said she wanted to create a dress that mixed feminine layers with industrial mechanics.
What’s a dress without jewelry?
Complementing the gown is the ornate necklace crafted by English designer Katherine Hawkins – also from parts from a Ford Focus.  The piece uses dials, springs, buttons and seat material.

The centerpiece of the creation is a grouping of instrument panel switches, while coiled springs dangle in a chandelier style and colorful dials and buttons frame the upper portion.

The two designers undertook their challenges separately – neither was aware of what the other was creating.

Both Clark and Hawkins were pleased with the way their unique creations turned out. Only don’t ask Hawkins to name the pieces she used – she doesn’t drive.

To see the more of the dress and necklace, click here.